CALIFORNIA’S MANDATORY WATER CONSERVATION: WHY YOUR STARBUCKS COFFEE TASTES DIFFERENT

imageSEATTLE, Washington (The Adobo Chronicles) – If you live in California and are a certified Starbucks fan, you may have noticed that your tall, grande or venti coffee and latte have been tasting different lately. You are not imagining things.

Blame it on Governor Jerry Brown who has instituted a mandatory 25% reduction in the state’s water consumption as a way to deal with the worsening California drought.

As a law-abiding, socially and environmentally-conscious company, the Seattle-based Starbucks has implemented a no-nonsense water conservation measure in all its stores, at least in the state of California.

The measure involves a 25% reduction in the water content of every cup sold at its California stores. This means that your brewed coffee tastes stronger but at the same time, you get 25% less in liquid volume. Stores now also use 25% less ice cubes in their iced coffee.

Many Starbucks coffee fans we talked to didn’t seem to mind the change, but at the same time noticed that they have increased the number of visits to their neigborhood Starbucks store from three to five times daily.

It’s a win-win situation. It helps with the state’s water conservation, it’s good for (Starbucks) business, and consumers get better-tasting coffee.

Click HERE to find out more about Starbucks’ water and energy conservation program.

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